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2022 Josh's Frogs Conservation Grant Winners

Please review the winners below and vote for your favorite here:

Association Mitsinjo - Madagascar

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
This grant money must be used for our research project, to study frog density around Andasibe region, especially for some materials for the survey and also to pay for the technician during the research.

What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
The frog species density from the Andasibe region is not yet well studied. It is so important to know about this because the Andasibe region has exceptional frog species, and it is one of the frog capitals in the island.

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
It is possible to see the result of this at the end of this research, our staff will collect data and all information during the research, data analysis must be present at the end of this research. We hope that this research will expose the amphibian richness in the region and possibly, new species will be recorded. Also, we hope that the density of the frog species will increase and it will encourage all experts to reinforce the research and study in this region.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
There is some impact to amphibian conservation, because this action will reinforce the protection of their natural habitat, and amphibians will be taken at the first hands of conservation value.

What are the larger implications of your work?
It helps me be more inclined towards the research and conservation work, and also can attract partners to know more about our work. Mitsinjo is one of a local community that runs the first captive breeding center here in Madagascar, so it is more important for us to be involved in amphibian conservation as much as we can, because there still a lot to do, but grants and financial resources are the force of our project. Even though we want to do more, it is impossible to achieve our goals without financial resources.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet community?
We would like to share this information to the reptile and amphibian pet community; please be the first responsible for our reptiles and amphibians richness, show to the world that you have a challenge to achieve their conservation. Share your experiment to the different pet community and especially with Association Mitsinjo because we need help from all experts and specialists.

How would someone make a donation to your organization?
More information can be found in our website associationmitsinjo.wordpress.com, Mitsinjo also has a bank account that someone can donate to. We have also (Rakotoarisoa Justin Claude) our project supervisor who leads the activity of the captive breeding can be reached by his email address [email protected] or +261 34 69 144 73. And of course myself the financial officer at Mitsinjo: Sam Alain Alimarisy, [email protected]  or +261 34 96 876 74   

Where could someone learn more about your project?
Please visit our website associationmitsinjo.wordpress.com for more information and also our Facebook page (association Mitsinjo or Mitsinjo Toby Sahona)

Anything else you feel we should know or discuss?
We would like to extend our activity related to conservation; we want to have a showroom or frog exhibit for environmental education and also for all tourists and visitors to make a fund for the association.

Endangered Wildlife Conservation Organization (EWCO) - Uganda

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
Threats to Leptopelis karissimbensis include indiscriminate inorganic pesticides use, and illegal
watering of cattle altering habitat quality hence reduced reproduction success. Inorganic
pesticide use is a common practice throughout Uganda. However, its indiscriminate use near
water bodies has extreme negative impact on frogs, and the paucity of data on this frog makes the
development of any long-term conservation program difficult. This project will document risks
to L. karissimbensis and its habitats, create awareness to reduce effects of indiscriminate
inorganic pesticide use, habitat restoration and removing invasive species. Construct cattle
drinking/watering points to reduce illegal grazing /watering cattle in the park.


What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
Amphibians are the most endangered group of vertebrates on the planet, suffering from severe
population losses brought on by invasive species, habitat degradation, and developing infectious
illnesses. Studies, sadly, reveal that places with the greatest amphibian richness also have the
largest global distribution of amphibian threats. Amphibians are typically viewed with low
regard by the general public and are small and cryptic when compared to the majority of
mammals. Even though the Global Amphibian Assessment and the activities that came out of it
have firmly placed amphibians high on the conservation agenda, they offer substantial obstacles
as candidate flagship species.
The purpose is to document the distribution, identify and reduce human related threats to
Leptopelis karissimbensis as a flagship species whilst improving knowledge for urgent
amphibian conservation planning in Uganda.
Our aim is to bring about positive change in the form of a reduction of resource extraction to
sustainable levels and the elimination of illegal activities such as logging. We will work with
communities to ascertain their livelihood needs and work to develop sustainable alternatives.
We will engage young people in this survey to facilitate their personal, social and educational
development and encourage them to become active members of our awareness activities, a vital
part of our work. We believe that developing education and communication initiatives for the
future generation at a young age will increase the effectiveness of our amphibian conservation
program by encouraging the appreciation of conserving wild species and habitats. All
educational activities will be guided by appropriate safe-guarding measures.

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
Results

  1. One (1) species distribution habitat suitability map and a draft amphibian conservation Action Plan for this species produced by December 2023 will be an indicator of our success in understanding the habitat preferences of the frog
  2. 1000 leaflets and 50 posters with awareness-raising messages are printed and distributed to 5 villages on the project site by December 2023
  3. 50 posters with awareness-raising messages and Information, education and communication materials for educating the public on how to reduce harmful effects of indiscriminate inorganic pesticide use, illegal grazing and watering cattle in the park and adjacent swamps, collecting of Non Timber Forest products as a source of fuel by December 2023 will be considered as success.
  4. 50 field workers, 50 Makerere University students, 10 Ugandan biologists, and 50 rangers identified and trained in herpetological taxonomy, ecology, and field methods, as well as amphibian survey methods and population monitoring by December 2023 will be considered as success.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
Endangered Wildlife Conservation Organization understands the value of conservation education
and communication as a crucial component of conservation outreach, with the ultimate goal of
altering attitudes toward conservation and encouraging pro-conservation behavior. In order to
successfully implement our conservation education and outreach program in schools, we will
need to develop pertinent information, communication, and educational print materials.
This grant will help us to support young people's (university students) personal, social, and
educational development and to motivate them to actively participate in our awareness-raising
efforts, which are an essential component of our work. We will involve young people. We think
that increasing the success of our program by educating and communicating to the next
generation at a young age about the value of and need to protect wild species
Objective (a) will be achieved through surveys in streams and rivers in Mughahinga gorilla
National Park by researchers together with locals. We propose to use time constrained sampling
method as described by Heyer et. al. (1994). Searches will be conducted in all suitable habitat
types beginning from sites where the species has historically been recorded. Based on site maps,
ranger experience and local knowledge, we will extend the searches throughout the conservation
area and other adjoining forests. Search techniques will include visual scanning of terrain and
opportunistic visual and acoustic encounter surveys. Whenever the species is detected, we will
collect suite of site and habitat data as well as GPS coordinates of the locality.
Physical observations and interviewing local people to document activities posing threats to
Leptopelis karissimbensis and its habitats will be used.

Prior to fieldwork, a literature review will be carried out focusing on: the location of the study
area; habitat composition - past and present; distribution and diversity of the herpetofauna in the
project area if any; and adjacent habitats/ecosystems.
For objective b) –we will develop educational outreach and awareness actions with local
people to promote a long lasting conservation of the species in their natural environment. We
will provide general information and promote awareness campaigns in response to a range of
threats that will be identified through meeting with communities bordering the park. For this
objective, we will focus mainly on community-based conservation education geared towards
improving understanding of the need for the conservation of amphibians within the national
park
.
For objective c and d ) We will carry out removal of invasive trees and planting of native
species. This action will prevent the increasing habitat destruction and degradation due to the
extension of pine tree plantations, and hopefully improve the habitat quality, planting native
species to allow better conditions for the recovery and conservation of the target species. To
decrease the willingness of farmers to engage in activities that threaten the survival of the
species, we will use a behaviour change program by capitalizing on the highly devout nature of
Ugandans and educate them at religious gatherings schools and communities in an innovative
behaviour change campaign through outreach aimed at improving conservation knowledge and
instigating positive behaviour changes.


What are the larger implications of your work?
The purpose is to document the distribution, identify and reduce human related threats to
Leptopelis karissimbensis as a flagship species whilst improving knowledge for urgent
amphibian conservation planning in Uganda

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet
community?

It is crucial for amphibian conservation to strike a balance between the short-term requirements
of locals who live close to amphibian habitats and the long-term gains that conservation
initiatives can produce. Since there is a lack of public knowledge of amphibians worldwide, this
project will take the approach that public education and communication will encourage and
empower people to save amphibians from extinction and will also increase the effectiveness of
conservation activities. Without a question, the community of people who keep reptiles and
amphibians as pets must continue to support these initiatives.


How would someone make a donation to your organization?
Equity Bank
BENEFICIARY NAME: ENDANGERED WILDLIFE CONSERVATION HUB LTD
ACCOUNT NUMBER: 1046201917373
BENEFICIARY BANK NAME: EQUITY BANK UGANDA LIMITED
SWIFT CODE: EQBLUGKA BANK CODE: 300147
IBAN CODE: 1046201917373
CORRESPONDENT BANK DETAILS (as per the transfer currency type)
USD INTERMEDIARY BANK NAME: CITI BANK NEWYORK SWIFT:
CITIUS33ACCOUNT NUMBER: 36925881

Where could someone learn more about your project?
https://ewco.org.ug/
https://twitter.com/endageredwco
https://www.facebook.com/endageredwildlifeconservationorganisation/
https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCvHoUVYU-IxjMvOoe6y8Igg


Anything else you feel we should know or discuss?
Additionally, we would like to take advantage of your networks to expand our visibility, find sponsors,
and gain support for our work.

Natural Tanks - Panama

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
We plan on using the fund to install our in situ pods for Oophaga vicentei.

What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
Each site costs approximately $2000, this grant will give us a significant amount to start the first site within the species' distribution. 

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
We expect results 5 to 6 months after the habitat modification is done. We also want to make as many of these as we can to change the downtrend of Oophaga vicentei's wild populations.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
This project is very significant because of two reasons:
1-Oophaga vicentei is endemic to Panama and is currently endangered.
2- This will be Panama's first permanent in situ conservation project for any amphibian.


What are the larger implications of your work?
Our goal is to get species out of the IUCN red list. This project's method will be published so that other conservationists around the world can do the same methodology and help other species.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet community?
There is a lot of information in my instagram account @TheFrogBreeder

How would someone make a donation to your organization?
www.patreon.com/TheFrogBreeder

Where could someone learn more about your project?
instagram @TheFrogBreeder

Reptile Youth Alliance Foundation - Eustis, FL

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
In order to bring greater awareness to the issues facing reptile and amphibian conservation, with specific attention to obtaining funding for research, The Reptile Youth Alliance will host a National Research Conference. Through the annual Reptile Youth Alliance Research Conference, hundreds of the nation's students are challenged to go beyond their classroom studies to do independent project-based research. They work independently or in teams to address questions in the field of herpetology, a branch of zoology that deals with the study of reptiles and amphibians.

Students have an opportunity to present their work to the public and other students. The purpose of the Research Conference will be to promote learning activities focusing on Reptile and Amphibian Research as well as STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math) activities. The Research Conference will allow students to connect with mentors and scientists who work in fields such as herpetology. Students will experience a hands-on approach to topics such as genetics, biology, ecology, and other STEM-related fields in which kids will work to develop, study, and collect data for reptile research and we will be able to share activities and curriculum with members throughout the country.

Careers in STEM related fields such as herpetology have continually lacked diversity. Considering a correlation between children losing interest in STEM-related subjects and certain social factors, The Reptile Youth Alliance strongly encourages kids from diverse demographics to participate. This is substantial as STEM activities have been shown to engage youth academically, socially, and emotionally. STEM-based activities strengthen learning skills such as teamwork, collaboration, self-regulations, critical thinking, and problem-solving, and boost curiosity. Furthermore, children interested in STEM-related subjects are more likely to have future academic and career success.

What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
We are working hard to ensure every kid who wants to participate in The Reptile Youth Alliance conference has the opportunity to be involved in this incredible event. However, these efforts would go much further with the support of winning this grant. With your support, we can keep the Reptile Youth Alliance Conference accessible to youth and give them access to a platform to showcase their research project while supporting reptile and amphibian conservation.

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
We have already started to see our desired results among the members of the Reptile Youth Alliance. The students who have been working on their projects have shown a passion for reptiles, amphibians, and science that is contagious! We know this enthusiasm will grow when they are able to present their projects to the public. Our hope is that this will educate the general public so that they are able to realize the importance of reptiles and amphibians.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
Amphibians are one of the most challenging to provide appropriate conservation efforts. Reptiles and amphibians as a whole face a larger threat compared to that of birds and mammals; however, the funding for conservation, research, and management of reptiles and amphibians remain far behind that of other species due to the higher economic value of other vertebrates. A significant problem for reptile and amphibian conservation is obtaining funding for research.  Inadequate research on reptiles and amphibians can result in inadequate care and management of species. Some of the most recent research projects involving amphibians that members of the Reptile Youth Alliance have worked on and will present at the conference are “Chytridiomycosis and Amphibian Disease Ecology” and “The outcomes of probiotic treatments for Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis”. Presenting these projects to the public will help to bring attention to the dire need for increased conservation and research efforts for amphibians.

What are the larger implications of your work?
The future of conservation will greatly depend on decisions from upcoming generations. We must do our part to encourage kids from all backgrounds to participate in STEM-related fields by providing sufficient opportunities that will hold their interest indefinitely. In doing so, we will have a significant chance to improve the future outcomes for BOTH the kids and reptiles. If the Reptile Youth Alliance is able to undo some of the harmful perceptions that affect reptiles by exposing kids to them at a young age, it will not only have a profound influence on reptile species' conservation status and our ecological stability but could also help us in the development of preventative and therapeutic treatments for disease.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet community?So much of the Reptile Youth Alliance is about building community and working together to increase conservation efforts, management, and care practices for Reptiles and Amphibians. We want to change how the general public view these animals by building conservation through unity, and reciprocally, unity through conservation. We want you all to be a part of this!

How would someone make a donation to your organization?
www.reptileyouthalliance.com/donate

Where could someone learn more about your project?
www.reptileyouthalliance.com

Ridgeview Conservancy - Princeton, NJ

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
This grant money will be used for the installation of a “Salamander Crossing” sign near vulnerable wetlands in Princeton, New Jersey. These wetlands, no more than 3 meters from the road, are a home to the spotted salamander in addition to numerous other amphibian species. This sign will help to instill caution in drivers as well as to spark an interest in herpetology and amphibian conservation in the community.

This funding will also be used to create reusable waterproof field guides for volunteers and students to use in identifying and learning about the spotted salamander and other local species. This grant will also be applied toward development and implementation of a vernal pool education workshop, teaching about the importance of wetlands in our ecosystems and how they provide a breeding ground for the foundation of the food web, from macroinvertebrates to amphibians.

What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
Winning this amphibian conservation grant allows our non-profit to engage with the broader community on the importance of amphibian conservation and educate on the critical need for wetlands conservation on the Princeton Ridge. This grant will help us raise awareness for Ridgeview Conservancy's cause by getting volunteers from our community involved in monitoring and protecting amphibian populations. 

Development pressure to build housing on the 90-acre woodland featuring the large-scale vernal ponds where these amphibians live is threatening this rich-wildlife habitat. Public education is needed.

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
We aim to inspire wetland protection and conservation and give people a reverence for the beautiful amphibious creatures that make up a key part of our ecosystems. As part of this educational process, we plan to help protect a 90-acre threatened wetland and forest habitat.

We hope that helping people to understand the presence and significance of wetlands and their amphibious life will further community involvement in land conservation efforts.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?

This will help to protect populations of spotted salamanders, Ambystoma maculatum, which rely on the area to breed and maintain their population. Additionally, other amphibian species reliant on these wetlands will be protected as well.

What are the larger implications of your work?
This tract of forest and wetland is the largest, oldest, unprotected forest left in Princeton. A developer is actively petitioning to place twenty luxury homes. Ridgeview Conservancy is working to conserve these 90 acres of ecologically sensitive wetlands and older growth forest through rigorous scientific research, education, coordinated student volunteer efforts, consortium building, and fundraising. These wetlands and natural springs also serve as headwaters to public drinking water supplies, featuring exceptional water quality, especially when compared to other ecosystems in the region. 

People should also understand that by protecting animals like the spotted salamanders they benefit themselves by helping to maintain healthy and balanced ecosystems. By keeping our wetlands clean, we are also keeping our drinking water safe.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet community?
Amphibian populations are subject to a new threat from the Bd fungus. 

Chytridiomycosis disease is easily spread by humans. It is important that wild amphibians are not moved between habitats. Habitat loss, climate change, and increased pollutants have been shown to increase amphibian population vulnerability. 

https://cwhl.vet.cornell.edu/disease/chytridiomycosis

How would someone make a donation to your organization?
Donations can be made through the Ridgeview Conservancy Website.
https://www.ridgeviewconservancy.org/donate 

Where could someone learn more about your project?
More information about Ridgeview Conservancy can be found our website.
https://www.ridgeviewconservancy.org 

Safari Lake Geneva - Lake Geneva, WI

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
This project includes long term monitoring and conservation goals. Like many amphibians, the
Grenada frog has a narrow tolerance range for temperature and moisture extremes. Monitoring
microhabitat temperatures and precipitation is critical to understanding fluctuating observations.
If the award amount is $500, we will apply these funds towards purchasing temperature and
humidity loggers that provide data about the microhabitat fluctuations at each site where the frog
occurs.
One of the more challenging threats to the Grenada frog is the general lack of awareness of its
existence amongst Grenadians, and on a global scale. As a cryptic, night-active small grey
animal, they can easily go unnoticed. As with other non-charismatic species, these qualities have
possibly hindered funding awards. In addition to working with the forestry department in
Grenada on survey work, this project will include the development of accessible outreach
materials to build public awareness of the unique Grenada frog. If the award amount is $1,000,
we will contract Grenadian artists and educators to develop culturally appropriate content for an
activity book that can be distributed to Grenadians. If the award amount is $1,500, we will be
able to begin both important initiatives!


What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
With these funds we will be able to monitor critical microhabitat environmental data and develop
engaging outreach materials that will help to elevate the awareness of this unique frog.


When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
This project will continue over the course of at least five years. Microhabitat data will be
collected continually throughout that time frame, and the outreach materials will be distributed as
long as they are available. We hope to gain a better understanding of environmental conditions
over a long period. Outreach initiatives should be continuous to engage as wide an audience as
possible. A leading project goal is to raise awareness and stewardship of this unique species.


How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
With the information from the overall project, we can recommend management efforts to
reinforce habitat connectivity, bolster habitat quality and limit development throughout the
central highlands of Grenada. This information will prove critical in avoiding catastrophic losses.
Development of engaging outreach materials will help to elevate the awareness of this unique
frog.


What are the larger implications of your work?
Amphibians serve in many critical capacities within our ecosystems. Their conservation
should be of great importance, and yet the startling imperilment among class Amphibia is
extreme even for the current mass extinction. This decline is unprecedented among other taxa
throughout human history (Stuart et. al, 2004. Status and trends of amphibian declines and extinctions worldwide. Science, 306(5702), 1783–1786). This loss is not confined by geographic
barriers, habitat quality, or life histories. Recently, the greater hurdle became understanding the
reason for these declines. Despite renewed focus, conservation biologists continue to struggle
with data deficiencies as well as limited resources.
The specific roles that frogs play in the overall health of Grenada’s ecosystems have not
been directly examined, but they undoubtedly factor in many ecosystem service capacities. It is
also likely that amphibians, along with other predators, are serving to curb the prevalence of
mosquito-borne diseases, improving public health for human populations. More research is
needed to better understand these relationships and interactions on Grenada, further incentivizing
the maintenance of ecosystem integrity. Simply, the Grenada frog is unique in the world and its
preservation should garner support. These animals are part of an invaluable and complex
ecosystem upon which we rely, whether directly or indirectly.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet
community?

As herptile keepers, we have the unique opportunity to observe and appreciate how complex and
unfortunately misunderstood these animals are. Josh’s frogs offers the opportunity to support and
better understand their wild counterparts while also promoting stewardship through education.
Amphibian conservation biologists continue to struggle with data deficiencies as well as limited
resources. Island endemics like the Grenada frog are particularly vulnerable to extinction. They
are restricted to a relatively small area, and changes in their habitat or to their populations can
have extreme consequences. While the Grenada frog is important and deserves full funding, all
of these conservation projects deserve support.


How would someone make a donation to your organization?
Please go to the website for Safari Lake Geneva https://safarilakegeneva.com/animals-
conservation/
, or the https://safarilakegeneva.com/contact/ link.


Where could someone learn more about your project?
We are still developing a website but there have been many publications on this species and it is
featured in several Caribbean herptofauna guide books. Here are just a few:
-Harrison, B. C. (2021). Habitat and Conservation of the Endemic Grenada Frog (Pristimantis
euphronides) [Thesis, University of Wisconsin--Stout].
https://minds.wisconsin.edu/handle/1793/83085
-Harrison, B., Hedges, S. B. & Powell, R. (2021). Pristimantis euphronides. The IUCN Red List
of Threatened Species, 2021. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/iucn.uk.2021-
1.rlts.t56593A3043096.en

-Henderson, R. W, & Powell, R. (2018). Amphibians and Reptiles of the St. Vincent and Grenada
Banks, West Indies. Edition Chimaira.


Anything else you feel we should know or discuss?
The island of Grenada is home to two endemic terrestrial vertebrates, the Grenada dove
(Leptotila wellsi) and the Grenada frog (Pristimantis euphronides, Anura: Strabomantidae). The
Grenada dove is featured on the national emblem and is considered to be a national treasure. In
contrast, the Grenada frog is virtually unknown to Grenadians.
Historically, P. euphronides would have benefited from more habitat connectivity, allowing for
greater viability and resilience to withstand stochastic events. With being limited to elevations of
300 m or greater, this species is already restricted and with increasing habitat loss and
fragmentation, its dispersal abilities are further constrained. Continued monitoring will measure
representation by assessing genetic diversity in remaining isolated populations to inform
adaptability to these mounting pressures.

Recently hatched Grenada froglet. As direct developers, the tadpole stage is nonexistent and
offspring develop directly into froglets inside the egg.

The Biodiversity Group - Tucson, AZ

What specifically do you plan on using the grant money for?
Although funding from this grant won't support the entire breadth of the project, the money will fund many of its critical aspects. Among them are travel between the Rio Manduriacu Reserve and Quito for our field team; time-sensitive transport of live individuals of the Mindo glassfrog to the amphibian breeding center, Centro Jambatu; support for reserve guards and local community members for their assistance; food for the expedition, including salary for cooks that will be hired from the local community near the reserve; mule rental from the local community for gear and food transport to the study area within the canyon; and motorbike use from local community members.

What does winning this grant allow you to do that you might not have otherwise?
Simply put, we allocate awarded funds directly to the needs of a project, as we have minimal overhead expenses compared to larger organizations. In other words, grants such as this are incredibly important to achieving the work we do! Considering that 100% of the money from this grant is tabbed to support numerous aspects of the Mindo Glassfrog Project, sacrifice will certainly be required in its absence. Being awarded the highest amount possible from Josh's Frogs will allow for certain tasks that might not qualify as necessary, but are still really beneficial. For example, it's unpredictable how many trips will be necessary to and from the project site in the event frogs are found for the breeding program during time frames where it would be best to do multiple trips to ensure timely arrival and maximizing their odds of surviving the journey. Also important is having the ability to compensate the locals and reserve staff as much as possible for aiding our project for their time, assistance, and resources (e.g. mules, cooking, transportation, motorbike use).

When do you expect to see results from this? What are you hoping they look like?
The beauty in projects like this is that there are various outcomes that we hope our efforts will yield. Immediate returns after the spring expedition will come in the form of new data that better informs our understanding of the population of the Mindo glassfrog at the Rio Manduriacu Reserve and adjacent forest. For example, in addition to gaining new insights on their distribution and natural history, we hope that we can identify additional streams harboring these glassfrogs on the slope of the canyon situated outside of the reserve, as it would increase our chances of securing males and females for the assurance colony we want to establish with our partners at Centro Jambatu. This would be a welcome finding as our team will only collect individuals from the endangered forest outside of the reserve, whereas observational data will be collected from glassfrogs found from within the reserve.

Success with the initial goals will likely lead to a number of other outcomes moving forward. For one, securing individuals for the breeding colony will hopefully lead to a successful long-term breeding program that will inform proper captive husbandry, introduce this remarkable species to the captive industry in a responsible manner, yield funds to the conservation sector, and potentially lead to headstart programs for the species in the future if necessary. Moreover, considering that what is known about the Mindo glassfrog pales in comparison to what is not yet known, the best way to fill these knowledge gaps is to spend time in the field making observations and collecting data. Therefore, the odds of learning new insights about this elusive and threatened frog, as well as the species living alongside it, are high! Such data will not only lead to published contributions to be shared with the scientific community, but also better inform conservation planning and captive breeding moving forward.

How will this impact amphibian conservation specific to this instance?
In this instance, and in addition to the potential benefits of the assurance colony that we hope to establish, our efforts will enhance the ability to protect this species and the endangered Andean forest in which this unique population lives. Thus far, similar expeditions our team has conducted to the Manduriacu Reserve have already helped secure funds that have expanded the reserve boundaries, and also led to a reassessment of multiple species' IUCN threat status, including the Mindo glassfrog. Continuing research expeditions at the reserve is critical to progressing efforts to protect such highly threatened species and to maintain collaborative engagements with the local community and reserve staff to these ends.

What are the larger implications of your work?
Currently, there are 63 species of glassfrogs recognized from the small, equatorial country of Ecuador. Such incredible biodiversity, which includes many other amphibian groups as well, is largely explained by diversification patterns within the Tropical Andes. In fact, two of the three most recent glassfrogs known from Ecuador were a result of contributions by our team. Unfortunately, Andean forests are quickly disappearing largely due to mining and other forms of habitat modification. Efforts such as our proposed project serve to illuminate the importance of protecting these forests and the threatened species that rely on them for survival. Moreover, collaborative efforts with our partners in Ecuador aim to include local community involvement near the reserve in order to broaden knowledge of their ""backyard"" biodiversity, the importance of protecting it, and ways in which they can consider more sustainable forms of work compared to destructive practices such as mining. Without these types of projects and making efforts to include local communities in the process of both science and the economics that go into it, labor involving large-scale resource extraction will continue to be the primary alternative option to their traditional practices, and the true levels of biodiversity that reside in remote, yet increasingly threatened habitats will likely never be realized before they’re gone.

What message or information would you like to share with the reptile and amphibian pet community?
We all love frogs and we all want these amazing creatures to live their best lives possible. If we work together, we can magnify our impact and ensure these species thrive for many generations to come.

We are always looking for ways to work more closely with the husbandry community, so please reach out if you have any questions, would like to collaborate, or have ideas that you would like to share with us.

How would someone make a donation to your organization?
They can easily donate at https://biodiversitygroup.org/donate and there’s even options to donate cameras and other equipment with our Conservation Equipped program! Learn more at https://biodiversitygroup.org/conservation-equipped/

Where could someone learn more about your project?
The best way to learn more about who we are and the work we're doing is by going to our website, https://biodiversitygroup.org/. Therein, one can also find our publications to date, including those centering on the Mindo glassfrog and other amphibians from the Rio Manduriacu Reserve!

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